A very important issue that is being addressed every day in Dubai is that of water scarcity; Abu Dhabi would have proposed a solution to this somewhat visionary problem, trying to solve it thanks to icebergs, but it is still very difficult to apply this method; and until this dream is achievable, the United Arab Emirates continue on the road of what seems the most reliable way to ensure a constant supply of drinking water: desalination, that is the processing of water extracted from the sea to make it drinkable. Dubai, the largest city in the region, gets almost all of the water used for drinking and domestic use from desalination plants, which are among the largest in the world. Its need for water is at least as great as its aspirations to become an international hub of trade and tourism; thanks to the desalination plant of Jebel Ali, Dubai, city in the desert, In just a few decades it has been transformed from a fishing village into a city of lights and skyscrapers, able to rival Las Vegas.

In addition to becoming the home of the Burj Khalifa – the tallest building in the world -, it now hosts world-class events such as the Dubai Desert Classic golf and the Dubai Open tennis. In addition to the events there are also fixed attractions, such as the ski slope and the ice rink.

Our goal, through sustainable projects, is also to guarantee access to drinking water even in underdeveloped countries such as Madagascar, guaranteeing the right to health through the construction of water wells. 

Like other cities in the United Arab Emirates, Dubai lives on summer temperatures that reach 45 degrees Celsius, the rains are scarce, as well as the water reserves. So until the Antarctic icebergs appear on the coast, with or without penguins, desalination is the only way out. Operated by the Dubai Electricity and Water Authority, the Jebel Ali plant has a production capacity of 470 million imperial gallons per day, equivalent to 2.1 billion litres.
70% of the total comes from the five stations built by Fisia Italimpianti, a company that is part of the Salini Impregilo Group.

The size of the facility is understandable only considering the demographic boom that Dubai has experienced in recent years, and confirms the success of the city in achieving its goals. According to government statistics, residents amounted to 2.7 million in 2016, 90% more than the previous decade. And like the residents, the number of visitors also exploded, reaching 14.9 million in 2016.
Our goal, through sustainable projects, is also to guarantee access to drinking water even in underdeveloped countries such as Madagascar, guaranteeing the right to health through the construction of water wells. This project will improve the living conditions of the entire community.